Covenant Grove Garden Boutique

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Common Name: Sprenger's asparagus fern
Type: Herbaceous perennial
Family: Asparagaceae
Native Range: Temperate southern Africa
Zone: 9 to 11
Height: 2.00 to 3.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 4.00 feet
Bloom Time: Seasonal bloomer
Bloom Description: White
Sun: Part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Naturalize
Flower: Fragrant, Insignificant
Leaf: Evergreen
Fruit: Showy
Other: Thorns
Tolerate: Drought

Item #000

Culture

Winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11. Plants can be grown outdoors year round as long as temperatures never dip below 20-25 degrees F. Plants perform best in organically rich, consistently moist but well drained soils in part shade (bright indirect light or filtered sun). Avoid direct hot afternoon sun which may cause the leaves to yellow. Tolerates full shade, but foliage may turn a lighter green. Plants may die to the ground in light freezes, but roots remain hardy to about 20-25 degrees F. North of Zone 9, plants can be grown in containers that are overwintered indoors. Asparagus fern is easily grown as a houseplant in the St. Louis area because it tolerates a wide range of temperatures, does not require high humidity and is easily pruned. It is best grown with a well-drained, peaty potting mixture. Water regularly from spring to autumn. It does not require winter dormancy, but appreciates a resting period with reduced watering over the winter months. Performs well with regular temperatures in summer and minimum 50F temperatures in winter. This plant is often taken outside for the growing season and brought back inside in early fall. Pinch back stem tips as needed to maintain plant form and promote dense foliage growth. If plant loses its attractive shape, stems may be cut back close to the soil level to regenerate. Propagate by seed or division (separate tubers). Birds eat the berries and help spread the seed to new locations where the seed will often readily sprout. Self-seeding can be mildly invasive in some subtropical to tropical areas (e.g., southern Florida and Hawaii).